Skip to Content

Spanish Salmorejo Recipe (Cold Tomato Bread Soup)

Sharing is caring!

This post may contain affiliate links, meaning if you book or buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission at no additional cost to you. Learn more

Creamy, refreshing, and truly wholesome, my salmorejo recipe is simple to prepare and a great way to bring some Spanish-themed flair and flavor to your dinner party.

Salmorejo with boiled eggs and Spanish ham

Salmorejo Recipe

Salmorejo

What is Traditional Salmorejo?

Hailing from the beautiful territory of Andalusia (with some believing the recipe was brought there from Alentejo in Portugal), classic salmorejo is a cold soup consisting of some iconic Mediterranean ingredients.

It is made from a base of tomatoes, traditionally skinned, that are blended or puréed with bread, traditionally pan de telera, extra virgin olive oil, garlic, and salt.

You’ll often see it garnished with cuts or pieces of Ibérico ham and chopped or diced hard-boiled eggs. The soup is thick and creamy, with sweetness from the tomatoes and garlic, and the acidity of the tomatoes balanced with the bread and olive oil.

Variations

Difference Between Salmorejo and Gazpacho

Both these cold tomato-based soups are beloved staples of Spanish cuisine. They share many similarities, and when people make them get liberal with the ingredients, often, one can be mistaken for the other.

As a general rule of thumb, salmorejo only contains tomatoes, bread, olive oil, salt, and garlic while gazpacho can contain additional ingredients, such as green pepper, red pepper, cumin, and sherry vinegar. Salmorejo has more of a pink-orange hue, and it’s much thicker than gazpacho due to the fact it typically uses a higher ratio of olive oil and bread to tomatoes in the making of the soup. Some people even consider salmorejo a dip rather than a soup.

Ardoria – Andalusia is home to many variations of salmorejo, one of which is Ardoria. This recipe adds red bell pepper to the soup.

Porra Antequerana – Another popular variation, Porra Antequerana is typically much thicker than your traditional salmorejo, and because of this, is often served as a tapa. It can be served with tuna and other cold cuts of meat, along with or instead of ham and hard-boiled egg.

Bread – As mentioned, traditionally, a bread known as pan de telera is used. However, this can be difficult to source. Hence, we have used a baguette in our recipe.

Ham – Traditionally, Ibérico ham is used. We have used Serrano ham in our recipe, and you could use other types of Spanish ham. If you want to honor tradition, if you can, opt for Ibérico ham.

Recipe Ingredients

To make my filling, pleasantly sweet, and refreshing salmorejo recipe, you’ll need the following ingredients (for about 4 servings):

Salmorejo ingredients
  • Tomatoes – 2 lb
  • Bread – 1 small baguette or half a large one (about 4.5 oz or 130 grams)
  • Garlic – 1 small garlic clove
  • Olive Oil – 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus an additional 1 tbsp for drizzling on top
  • Salt – 1 tsp kosher salt (or 1/2 tsp fine sea salt)
  • Eggs – 2 eggs
  • Serrano Ham – 8 slices

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1 – Boil the eggs using your favorite method. My method for boiling the eggs is as follows:

  • Add the eggs and 1 tsp of salt to a pot and add enough water to cover the eggs by about an inch.
  • Bring the water to a boil, and once boiling, let the eggs boil at a low boil for about 5 minutes.
  • Turn off the heat and remove the pot from the hob, and let it stand for 5 minutes.
  • Transfer the eggs to a bowl with cold water.
  • Once the eggs are cold enough to handle, peel them.

Step 2 – Cut the tomatoes into chunks, removing the hard core with a pairing knife.

Making salmorejo (chopping the tomatoes).

Step 3 – Blend the tomatoes, salt, and garlic. If using a high-speed blender like ours, you’ll only need about 45-60 seconds on high speed. You also do not need to strain the tomato mixture in step 4 below.

Making salmorejo (tomatoes, garlic, and salt in a high-speed blender).
Making salmorejo (tomatoes, garlic, and salt in a high-speed blender).
Making salmorejo (blended tomatoes, garlic, and salt in a high-speed blender).

Step 4 – If your blender isn’t very strong and did not break down all the tomato seeds and skin, we recommend straining the mixture via a fine-mesh sieve.

Making salmorejo (straining the tomato mixture).
Making salmorejo (straining the tomato mixture).

Step 5 – Add the bread and blend until the bread is incorporated (about 10-15 seconds in a high-speed blender).

Making salmorejo (adding bread to the salmorejo).

Step 6 – Blend the salmorejo while slowly adding in the olive oil to emulsify.

Making salmorejo (adding olive oil to the salmorejo).
Making salmorejo (blended final salmorejo).

Step 7 – This recipe makes about 4 portions, so divide the salmorejo into four bowls.

Making salmorejo (salmorejo in bowls).

What to Serve with Salmorejo

Step 8 – Top with boiled eggs and ham for the traditional way to serve it. Drizzle a touch of olive oil to decorate it.

Making salmorejo (toppings for salmorejo).
Salmorejo with toppings

You could also try it with:

Canned Tuna – Popular in Andalusia, especially when serving Porra antequeranca.

Cold Cuts – Ibérico ham is the traditional choice, but lots of cold cuts of ham and other meats could be used as a topping, either diced or rolled.

Leftover Bread – Not necessarily traditional, but if you do have some leftover bread, you could tear it up and serve it on top of the soup.

Salmorejo with toppings

Salmorejo Recipe Card

Yield: 4 portions

Salmorejo

Salmorejo
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 lb tomatoes
  • 1 small baguette or half a large one (about 4.5 oz or 130 grams)
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus an additional 1 tbsp for drizzling on top of the salmorejo in the bowls
  • 1 tsp kosher salt (or 1/2 tsp fine sea salt)
  • 2 eggs
  • 8 slices of Serrano ham or Iberico ham

Instructions

  1. Boil the eggs using your favorite method. My method for boiling the eggs is as follows:

    Add the eggs and 1 tsp of salt to a pot and add enough water to cover the eggs by about an inch.

    Bring the water to a boil, and once boiling, let the eggs boil at a low boil for about 5 minutes.

    Turn off the heat and remove the pot from the hob, and let it stand for 5 minutes.

    Transfer the eggs to a bowl with cold water.

    Once the eggs are cold enough to handle, peel them.
  2. Cut the tomatoes into chunks, removing the hard core with a pairing knife.
  3. Blend the tomatoes, salt, and garlic. If using a high-speed blender like ours, you’ll only need about 45-60 seconds on high speed. You also do not need to strain the tomato mixture in step 4 below.
  4. If your blender isn’t very strong and did not break down all the tomato seeds and skin, we recommend straining the mixture via a fine-mesh sieve.
  5. Add the bread and blend until the bread is incorporated (about 10-15 seconds in a high-speed blender).
  6. Blend the salmorejo while slowly adding in the olive oil to emulsify.
  7. This recipe makes about 4 portions, so divide the salmorejo into four bowls.
  8. Top with boiled eggs and ham for the traditional way to serve it. Drizzle a touch of olive oil to decorate it.

You Might Also Like to Read

Save and Pin for Later

Looking for a thick, refreshing cold soup to enjoy with family and friends this summer? Keep my recipe for safekeeping by pinning it to one of your boards.

Salmorejo with toppings

Authors

  • Doina Johnson is a recipe developer and writer. Doina has been cooking for most of her life, and her style draws from many different influences. She cooked with her mother and grandma growing up in Eastern Europe, before adding modern, western influences to her style when living in the United States for about a decade. Then, she traveled full-time for several years, trying food in Europe, Asia, and South America, and bringing those influences into her own cooking. She strives to introduce passionate homecooks to world cuisine, generally by trying the food herself abroad and then recreating it at home and, at times, enlisting the help of local foodies and chefs.

  • Hey there! We are Dale and Doina, the founders of Nomad Paradise. We traveled full-time for over three years, and while we now have a home base in the U.K., continue to take trips abroad to visit new places and try new cuisines and foods. Our food guides are curated with the guidance of local foodies, and their contribution is indicated under each article. We also cook the foods we try abroad, and you can discover how to make them in our 'recipes from around the world' category.

Sharing is caring!

Skip to Recipe